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Oxy Acetylene Welding For Dummies

By Francis Haike

Oxy Acetylene Welding and Cutting Materials

Oxy acetylene welding is an autogenous welding process, in which two parts of the same or different metals are joined by causing the edges to melt and unite while molten without the aid of hammering or compression. When cool, the parts will form one whole piece of metal.

The oxy acetylene welding flame is made by mixing oxygen and acetylene gases in a special welding torch or blowpipe, producing, when burned, a heat of 6,300 degrees, which is more than twice the melting temperature of the most common metals. This flame, while being of intense heat, is of very small size.

Oxy Acetylene Cutting

The process of cutting metals with the oxy acetylene welding flame produced from oxygen and acetylene depends on the fact that a jet of oxygen directed upon hot metal causes the metal itself to burn away with great rapidity, resulting in a narrow slot through the section cut. The action is so fast that metal is not injured on either side of the cut.

Carbon Removal

This process depends on the fact that carbon will burn and almost completely vanish if the action is assisted with a supply of pure oxygen gas. After the combustion is started with any convenient flame, it continues as long as carbon remains in the path of the jet of oxygen.

Materials

For the performance of the above operations we require the two gases, oxygen and acetylene, to produce the oxy acetylene welding flames; rods of metal which may be added to the joints while molten in order to give the weld sufficient strength and proper form, and various chemical powders, called fluxes, which assist in the flow of metal and in doing away with many of the impurities and other objectionable features.

Article submitted by Francis Haike

About the author:
Francis Haike, a 20 year veteran of all aspects of welding will take you by the hand and show you exactly how to develop all welding techniques he uses in his everyday business at http://www.startwelding.com


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